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Beat College Stress

beat college stress

College is back in session, and it’s time to get your financial aid in line and buy all of those books you may never be required to open for class. It’s time to remember where you put your meal card, find where all of your classes are on campus, move into your dorm room for the semester, and to pull your hair out from all the stress. College is extraordinarily stressful, but it’s going to be OK because you’re doing the right thing supporting yourself by searching for tips to beat the stress of starting a new semester. Read on to discover five back-to-school tips to help you through the worst of it.

  1. Make sure you allow yourself to rest

Sleep is important. When people think about college, excessive coffee consumption and all-nighters come to mind. Doing this will put you at a disadvantage, even if you are young and full of energy. The human brain doesn’t retain information quite so well on a sleepless night because you need sleep to consolidate memories. If you take an introductory psychology course, you might learn all about this. So, make sure you take time for yourself and sleep. If you’re having trouble falling asleep, you might want to check out the last stress-beating strategy on this list for further help.

  1. Organize your day

Your head is spinning with all of the tasks you must complete. You’ve got term papers to write and a club meeting to attend. You have to go to food service, your friends want to hang out after dinner, and your mom keeps calling, but you don’t have time to answer. You have to do several readings in the next two days, and you have to go to work. This description is what college life can look like on a daily basis, and this is why a lot of college students don’t even bother with laundry. Try using a planner to organize your day. Not only will this make you feel more in control of your day, but you will also benefit from this habit in the long run after college when your future career makes college look like child’s play.

  1. Find a quiet place to study

The dorms are not always the best place to try to get anything done. If it’s not someone blasting music in the room next door, it’s your roommate coming in and out while you’re trying to get through the most tedious assigned reading you’ve ever read in your life. When the weather is good, try finding a place outside to do your reading. If it’s wet and gloomy, try your campus library. You can usually find private study rooms that cost nothing to check out for a couple of hours to allow you a safe, quiet place to get your homework done.

  1. Keep in touch with loved ones

There’s not a lot of time for anything while you’re in college, but it is crucial for your well-being to reach out to your support group when times get tough. Sometimes you’re going to feel like giving up. That’s OK. Every college student feels this way at some point. Call your childhood friend, a parent, a grandparent, or even a high school teacher who was supportive of you. Just touch base with those who care about you. Their encouragement could be all you need to blow off the stress.

  1. Make use of free mental health services on your campus

Each college typically offers free behavioral health services to students who are struggling. Help is available if you are having problems focusing on your work or sleeping through the night, or are just feeling lost and in need of guidance.  Counselors are also there to help with test anxiety and social anxiety.  Friends and family are excellent advocates most of the time, but they may not be able to help with everything. Not everyone has someone to lean on while in college. The campus provides mental health services for everyone. Counselors are trained to assist students with the stress of college. Don’t be afraid to reach out if you are struggling.

It’s natural to feel pressure in college, so it is important to take care of yourself during your experience.  A few smart habits, such as planning out your day, finding a great study area, and making sure you’re getting enough sleep, can go a long way in helping you stay mentally fit.  Remember, if the stress becomes unbearable, it’s good to reach out to your support group or a college counselor.  It may be just what you need to get you on the path to graduation.

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