Coronavirus FAQ: Learn About COVID-19

Coronavirus FAQ: Learn About COVID-19

What is Coronavirus?

 


The following answers provided by SignatureCare Emergency Center’s ER physicians. To send in your questions, complete our short form to submit your coronavirus questions.


  1. If I am HIV positive, what are my chances of contracting the disease?

    Answer: No specific data available at this time to know the specifics. The risk of contracting is likely to be similar to the rest of the population, which is already considered high. However, once contracted, someone with HIV may have a worse outcome than the average person. That is why it is very important to be extra careful if you are HIV positive.

  2. What is the cost of COVID-19 testing?

    Answer: We are now offering COVID-19 testing. We only offer it as part of our ER visit. No separate pricing structure for the tests itself. For those patients that have no insurance coverage, can take advantage of our cash pay option and can get COVID-19 testing done for as low as $175.

  3. Can I go retest for Covid-19 at one of your locations?

    Answer: Yes, We can test for PCR as well as antibody tests. Soon we will have the capability to perform Antigen tests as well.

  4. How long will it take to get the results?

    Answer: Usually 1 to 2 days. Starting next week we will have 1 rapid 15 minute test as well.

  5. Can I obtain testing and antibody screening if I’m asymptomatic?

    Answer: Yes. We encourage folks who may have exposure to get tested even if they are asymptomatic.

  6. Do you do Covid-19 test with someone without symptoms?

    Answer: Yes. We encourage folks who may have exposure to get tested even if they are asymptomatic.

  7. Do you have the antibody test available?

    Answer: Yes

  8. I had a little cough on Saturday, but I’m over it now, do I need a coronavirus test?

    Answer: Unfortunately We do not give medical advice over the internet. Please contact your medical provider for advice. If you have no symptoms and you are not at risk of giving the infection to anybody else, then there is not an urgent need to be tested. Please make sure you are wearing a mask, and practicing good hygiene and social distancing. If you want to know if you have contracted Coronavirus, then you can get tested.

  9. I have a cough with slight chest pain, but I have not had a fever or any other symptoms. How should I handle this?

    Answer: Unfortunately We do not give medical advice over the internet. Please contact your medical provider for advice.

  10. I went to New Orleans in the middle of January. I came back and got extremely sick. My Doctor treated me like I had the flu. Can I still be tested to see if I have already had the virus?

    Answer: Yes, You can have the PCR + Antibody tests done. Antibody test to find out if you had the infection in the past, and the PCR test just in case you are infected now and are not showing any symptoms.

  11. My husband was seen on Tuesday morning. He was having stomach problems. He was tested for the Coronavirus. His results came back and he has the virus. What should myself and my two daughters be doing to not get the virus. And should we come in and get tested?

    Answer: If you and your daughter are exposed, then it is a good idea to get tested. However, there is no specific approved treatment at this time, so if you are infected, and you are doing well, the current recommendation is to wait and watch. Please follow CDC guidelines to avoid contact with your husband until he is cleared.

  12. My child is having bad allergy problems like, sneezing, and stuffy nose. Is it a part of some of the symptoms of the virus?

    Answer: Allergy season is upon us. While it is difficult to tell what caused the symptoms, it could very likely be seasonal allergies. Unfortunately a virus infection cannot be ruled out entirely. Please consult a healthcare provider if you need further direction. At this time, even if your child has the virus, and is showing minor symptoms, there are no specific treatment options available.

  13. Are you able to test for previously having COVID-19 symptoms? And are you only testing symptomatic patients?

    Answer: Yes, with the help of our Antibody test, we can test to see if a person was infected in the past or has current infection. We encourage folks who may have exposure to get tested even if they are asymptomatic.

  14. My sister was exposed, and I was exposed to her kids. I had a fever and I have a cough. I need to get tested so I can go back to work. When could I do this? Do I need an appointment?

    Answer: If you have symptoms, then you can get tested now. No appointment is needed at SignatureCare Emergency Center. We are open 24/7.

  15. I have no fever seems like allergies no cold my throat is sore and itchy tight chest like pre- developing cough I’ve had these symptoms just today suddenly but I did notice a lump or swelling under my chin below jawline its sensitive feels hard but not painful that is my main concern I have not traveled anywhere and very rarely go outside the house no one in household is sick or has been exposed to anyone diagnosed with covid-19 I’m worry about swelling under neck so far i can breathe fine and able to take deep breaths please email me if it’s something I should go get seen for right away !

    Answer: Allergy season is upon us. While it is difficult to tell what caused the symptoms, it could very likely be seasonal allergies. Unfortunately a virus infection cannot be ruled out entirely. Please consult a healthcare provider if you need further direction. At this time, even if you have contracted the virus, and is showing minor symptoms, there are no specific treatment options available. We recommend everyone who has minor flu-like symptoms to stay hydrated, rested and take Over-the-counter medication for their symptoms.


The following questions and answers courtesy of The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.


Here are answers to these commonly asked questions about the Coronavirus.

  1. What is novel coronavirus?
  2. Why is the disease being called coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19?
  3. What is the name of the virus causing the outbreak of coronavirus disease?
  4. Is SARS-CoV-2 (the virus causing COVID-19) the same as the MERS_CoV or SARS-CoV?
  5. What is the source of the virus?
  6. How does the virus spread?
  7. Can someone who has had COVID-19 spread the illness to others?
  8. Can someone who has been quarantined for COVID-19 spread the illness to others?
  9. Can the virus that causes COVID-19 be spread through food, including refrigerated or frozen food?
  10. Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19?
  11. What is community spread?

1. What is Novel Coronavirus?

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

2. Why is the disease being called Coronavirus Disease 2019, COVID-19?

On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization (WHO) announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China.

The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused be a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. The name of this disease was selected following the World Health Organization (WHO) best practice for naming of new human infectious diseases.

3. What is the name of the virus causing the outbreak of Coronavirus disease?

On February 11, 2020, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, charged with naming new viruses, named the novel coronavirus, first identified in Wuhan, China, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, shortened to SARS-CoV-2.

As the name indicates, the virus is related to the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that caused an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002-2003, however it is not the same virus.

4. Is SARS-CoV-2 (the virus causing COVID-19) the same as the MERS_CoV or SARS-CoV?

No. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses.

Some coronaviruses cause cold-like illnesses in people. Others cause illness in certain types of animals, such as cattle, camels and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can spread to people. This happened with SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV.

The virus that causes COVID-19 likely also originated in an animal and spread to humans. The coronavirus most similar to the virus causing COVID-19 is SARS-CoV. There are ongoing investigations to learn more. The situation is changing, and information will be updated as it becomes available.

5. What is the source of the Virus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people, and others, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses that infect animals have emerged to infect people and can spread between people.

This is suspected to have occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19.

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people.

6. How does the Virus spread?

This virus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person.

It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so.

The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas.

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

7. Can someone who has had COVID-19 spread the illness to others?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others.

That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:

  • The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
  • The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
  • The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

8. Can someone who has been quarantined for COVID-19 spread the illness to others?

Quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed illness (symptoms) from others who have not been exposed, in order to prevent the possible spread of that disease.

Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses.

Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

9. Can the virus that causes COVID-19 be spread through food, including refrigerated or frozen food?

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets.

Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food.

Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

10. Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19?

It is not yet known whether weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19.

Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months.

At this time, it is not known whether the spread of COVID-19 will decrease when weather becomes warmer. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.

11. What is Community Spread?

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

By | March 9th, 2020|Categories: Community, Health & Wellness|Tags: , |